Essay

Joseph Beuys: Set Between One and All

Beuys and Warhol shared together a clear insight and vision of the deep quake that had shaken the time-honored foundations of the art world. With the abandonment of all past criteria of excellence and the rapid obsolescence of the notions of originality and genius, the gates became suddenly opened for all to claim their share of artistic creativity, fame and success. Anyone and everyone could lay a claim to fame (Warhol); anyone and everyone could become an artist (Beuys). Both artists embodied the demographic revolution in the art world that can be considered as the most marking art historical phenomenon in our era: the people massively conquered the art scene.

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Essay

Representing Limitlessness: Rachel Howard’s Repetition is Truth – Via Dolorosa

One enters a room with fourteen Stations of the Cross by Rachel Howard–her Via Dolorosa. Monumental, quiet, graceful, discrete, luscious, restrained and yet, at the same time, forceful, masterful, deafening – these paintings yield more layers of emotions than one can absorb all at once. Response: a gasp, silence; trying to catch one’s breath, aghast. A simple yet definite experience of the sublime is taking place. So rarely do we experience such strong aesthetic emotions in the presence of recent works of art that I feel the need to check and ponder how Howard’s works conjure up such a response.

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Article

A Conversation – Tim Eitel and Joachim Pissarro

Joachim Pissarro: Can you describe your practice—your inspiration and technique—for this new series of paintings?

Tim Eitel: The paintings are all based on photographs that I take on city streets. The photographs are quite casual, but each one is part of an ongoing investigation. Typically, I get attached to an idea or motif and work through it for as long as I am attracted to it. Right now I am interested in doing portraits of homeless people and at the same time I am working on images of various security forces—police, soldiers, guards—which seem more and more omnipresent wherever I go.

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Review

Double Review of Molly Nesbit’s Their Common Sense and Luc Ferry’s Le sens du beau

The meanders of chance are such that these two books came out within a few months of each other, one in Great Britian, the other in France. Both deal with similar issues (the origins of modern art and contemporary culture), focus closely on related concepts (the 18th-century aesthetic notions of “common sense” and the “sense of beauty”), and refer to the same authors: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant (for whom the notion of “common sense” was the keystone of his aesthetic system), and Friedrich Nietzsche (for whom the very notion of “common sense” was an aberration).

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Article

Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

Visiting Frank Gehry’s new building—the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao—is a life-transforming experience. The urban space of the Basque capital and its river, the Nervion, both define and are redefined by the new museum. At first sight its almost unreal, seemingly weightless, resplendent titanium-coated volumes look peculiarly organic despite their geometric shapes. Once inside, the dialogues that take place continuously between the works of art on display and this surprising, ceaselessly flowing building create an experience at once physical intellectual and even spiritual.

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Article

Camille Pissarro: A Case Study in Impressionist Drawing

The following is an excerpt from an article written with Christopher Llyod in the December 1997 issue of On Paper. For the full article please download the PDF. Excerpt: It is an irony symptomatic of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist studies that, while the volumes of literature on this moment in the history of art never cease […]

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Review

Pushing out the limits: ‘L’informe’

The following text is an excerpt from a review of ‘L’informe’ at the Centre Georges Pompidou that was originally featured in Apollo Magazine, November 1996. For the full text please download the PDF. Excerpt: ‘L’Informe’, the exhibition at the Centre Georges Pompidou organized last summer by Yve-Alain Bois and Rosalind Krauss, who also conceived and […]

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Review

Mondrian’s Antimonies

The following text is an excerpt from a review of a Piet Mondrian exhibition that took place at the National Gallery of Art, the Haags Gemeentemuseum, and the Museum of Modern Art and was published in Apollo, winter 1995. For the full review please download the PDF. Excerpt: La peinture reste pour moi le monde […]

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Review

Monet at the Art Institute of Chicago

The following text is an excerpt from a review of Monet at the Art Institute of Chicago published in Apollo Magazine, summer 1995. For the full text please download the PDF. Excerpt: Almost any French man or woman who spent the eve of Bastille Day at the Art Institute of Chicago this year would have […]

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